TRC News

In this section, you can catch up on what’s happening at TRC, our events, staff news, announcements and more.

You can trace events dating back to 2005 by clicking on “view older entries” at the top and bottom of each page.

TRC Website Opinion Poll November 2017

Dear Readers,

Please check out our new Opinion Poll on whether young children should be taught in their mother tongue, and cast your vote by the end of November 2017. As you know …

your opinion counts

Our October 2017 poll was about whether students should be punished or not:

Should students be punished?

Yes. When you don’t punish students you erode discipline and encourage unruly behavior. With certain disciplinary issues, punishment is the only thing that works. (12%, 5 Votes)

No. Positive guidance works better than punishment when it comes to teaching students right from wrong. (88%, 36 Votes)

Result:
The result of this opinion poll was in favour of not punishing students. The overwhelming majority (88%) of respondents believe that students should not be punished because guiding them positively is a better option for disciplinary purposes. On the other hand a small minority (5%) felt that punishment was necessary because if teachers don’t punish children it erodes discipline and encourages them to misbehave. 

TRC Website Opinion Poll October 2017

Dear Readers,

Please check out our new Opinion Poll on whether students should be punished or not, and cast your vote by the end of October 2017. As you know …

your opinion counts

Our September 2017 poll was about whether students should get homework during the holidays:

Should schools give homework during vacations?

Yes. To be promoted to the next grade students need to recall what they have been taught the previous year. Vacation homework is a refresher which prevents teachers from re-teaching basic skills. (26% 11 Votes)

No. The whole point of vacation is to relax and de-stress. Also, if students are going away for vacation, expecting them to carry their books with them is unreasonable. (74% 32 Votes)

Result:
The majority (74%) of respondents of this Opinion Poll believe that schools should not give homework during vacations. This is because they believe vacation is a time to relax and take a break from academics. A little over a quarter (26%) of the respondents believe that children should be given homework during vacations because it acts as a refresher and teachers don’t have to re-teach content in the new academic year.

TRC Website Opinion Poll September 2017

Dear Readers,

Please check out our new Opinion Poll on whether students should get homework during the holidays, and cast your vote by the end of September 2017. As you know …

your opinion counts

Our August 2017 poll was about politics and current events should be a part of a school’s curriculum:

Politics and current events should be a part of a school’s curriculum, because students should be aware of important political issues that shape society and impact their lives.

• I agree. Teaching children about political systems and current affairs is necessary for a strong democracy, which requires that people are interested and engaged in politics. (80%, 36 Votes)

• I disagree. Discussing politics can cause arguments and fighting between students. Also, schools should keep a neutral stance and that is difficult when politics is being discussed. (20%, 9 Votes)

Result:
A large majority of the respondents (80%) feel that teaching children about politics is necessary because it keeps people engaged in politics. They also feel that students should be aware of the political issues that impact their lives. Twenty-percent (20%) of the respondents feel that politics should be kept out of the classroom because it can cause disagreements between student. These respondents also feel that schools should adopt a neutral stance when it comes to politics.

News Bulletin January – June 2017

This was a busy and productive period for TRC. During this period TRC conducted 18 workshops and also successfully hosted a one-day ‘Thinking Classroom and Critical Thinking: Reshaping Educational Prospects’ academic conference for both public and private school teachers. Participants at the conference were able to attend 8 highly informative and interactive sessions and the event created a buzz about TRC. A critical thinking activity book and training video, which were created as part of TRC’s “Thinking Classroom” project, were launched at the conference.

During this period, TRC also became a part of a learning initiative called ‘Badal Do!’ which engaged schools and teachers, equipping them with tools of inclusive learning. TRC conducted a 3-day “Training of Master Trainers” as part of Badal Do! and was nominated the training lead for a consortium of 7 organisations that are part of the project. Our team trained nearly 200 teachers to carry out reflective practices. This was an important aspect of Badal Do!’s strategy which seeks to enhance teachers’ capacity for self-evaluation and helps them understand their influence on children and the community through these training sessions.

In May 2017, the Karachi Youth Initiative invited TRC to be part of the Partner Learning and Sharing Session that it had organised for its partner organisations. The purpose of the meeting was to generate ideas for a stronger and more resilient society, and share experiences and best practices.

TRC and the British Asian Trust (BAT) also collaborated for the “Strengthening ECE Provisions through Peer to Peer Learning in Government Schools”. The project seeks to deliver and promote a complete model for the ECE curriculum in government schools in low income urban areas.

TRC was represented at the Reform Support Unit’s policy dialogue on Early Childhood Care and Education and in March 2017 our representatives also presented on “The Thinking Classroom” project at the National Conference on Early Childhood Care and Education in Islamabad.

After a year of hectic activity and lots of learning, ECED-P students successfully completed their second and third (and final) term in the programme.

In June, our team members were also invited by the School Education Department, Sindh to share their expertise during a review of the draft curriculum for Early Childhood Care and Education, 2017. Our team members evaluated the draft and shared their findings with SED.

TRC also hosted an orientation session for the TKT (Teachers Knowledge Test) programme at its premises. TKT is a professional credential that focuses on core teaching concepts for teachers of English as a foreign language.

Finally, TRC continued its usual support activities for teachers and schools through its workshop programme and by chairing school events.

TRC Trending…

TRC is on Facebook! This is where we share ideas, tips and news with our online teaching community. It is a space to learn new ideas, share experiences and stay informed about all the latest happenings at TRC.
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TRC Website Opinion Poll August 2017

Dear Readers,

Please check out our new Opinion Poll on politics and current events should be a part of a school’s curriculum, and cast your vote by the end of August 2017. As you know …

your opinion counts

Our July 2017 poll was about posting students’ grades in public:

Students’ grades should not be posted publicly because it leads to situations which could be humiliating and awkward for those who haven’t done well.

• I agree. Grades do not reflect students’ capabilities. Public announcements of grades demoralise a child who is already feeling bad about not doing well and can lead to teasing and bullying. (88%, 43 Votes)

• I disagree. Public announcements of grades help students know where they stand in relation to others. Students will work harder to improve their grades if they know that results will be announced. (12%, 6 Votes)

Result:
A large majority of the respondents i.e. 88% feel that grades should not be displayed or announced in public because they can cause students who have failed or not done too well, to feel demoralised. Twelve percent (12%) of the respondents however, feel that displaying grades publicly can affect students differently and once they know where they stand in a group, it can compel those who did not do well to work harder to improve their grades.

TRC Website Opinion Poll July 2017

Dear Readers,

Please check out our new Opinion Poll on posting students’ grades in public, and cast your vote by the end of July 2017. As you know …

your opinion counts

Our June 2017 poll was about increasing teachers’ salaries:

Increasing salaries is the best way to attract and retain good teachers, and eventually to raise the quality of education being imparted.

• I agree. A good salary will attract better-trained graduates to the profession, because the reality is that financial motivation is the strongest factor in adopting and staying in a career. (67%, 37 Votes)

• I disagree. Attracting and retaining teachers requires a wider approach that ensures career progress, their status in society and increases their professional responsibility along with salaries. (33%, 18 Votes)

Result:
A sizeable majority (67%) of those who responded to this poll felt that financial motivation was the most important factor for people who opted and stayed in any career. Therefore these respondents felt that high salaries were key to attracting better trained personnel to teaching. On the other hand, a significant minority (33%) of the respondents feel that attracting good teachers is not simply a matter of offering them high salaries and that it was also important to increase the status of teachers in society and to ensure career progress.

TRC Website Opinion Poll June 2017

Dear Readers,

Please check out our new Opinion Poll on increasing teachers’ salaries, and cast your vote by the end of June 2017. As you know …

your opinion counts

Our April 2017 poll was about whether tests and exams should be open-book:

Tests and exams should be open-book, because they focus on understanding the material at a higher level, rather than testing a student’s memory and recall.

• I agree. Open book tests teach you how to find information when you need it. The questions are designed to teach students how to think; they have to prepare differently for these tests. (90%, 71 Votes)

• I disagree. Open-book tests take the rigour out of test preparation and let students off the hook. Students put more effort into studying for a traditional test and so learn the material better.  (10%, 8 Votes)

Result:
Those who think that tests and exams should be open-book won this poll by a big margin. A whopping ninety percent (90%) of the respondents feel that open book tests and exams are a more effective means of assessing students’ understanding and learning, rather than traditional closed-book tests that stress on memory and recall.  The remaining 1o% of the voters believe that the rigour that is part of traditional testing, is essential for learning.

TRC Website Opinion Poll March 2017

Dear Readers,

Please check out our new Opinion Poll on whether schools should make community service mandatory, and cast your vote by the end of March 2017. As you know …

your opinion counts

Our February 2017 poll was about whether schools should punish students:

Schools should not punish students in order to maintain discipline. Punishment simply perpetuates abuse and little is achieved in terms of discipline.

• I agree. Positive guidance works better to teach students right from wrong. (87%, 41 Votes)

• I disagree. When you don’t punish students you encourage unruly behavior. With certain disciplinary issues, punishment is the only thing that works. (13%, 6 Votes)

Result:
An overwhelming majority of respondents (87%) believe that positive guidance is a better way to teach students right and wrong. They believe that punishment perpetuates abuse and that in the end penalizing children doesn’t achieve anything. A small minority of respondents (13%) believe that not using punishment encourages children to misbehave and sometimes reprimanding and penalising them is the only thing that seems to work.

Quarterly News Bulletin October – December 2016

During this quarter, TRC successfully completed three training sessions in different parts of the country. The TRC team conducted a 5-day training of trainers at the Government College for Elementary Teachers at Kot Lakhpat in Lahore. The Early Childhood Education (ECE) training was arranged by the Directorate of Staff Development (DSD) and focused on ECE in light of the National Curriculum. On request from the Baluchistan Education Project (BEP) TRC staff conducted another two training of master trainers. One was an 8-day training on the National ECE Curriculum and the other was a 6-day training on education management and leadership skills.

Back in Karachi, the TRC teamed up with Little Art to organise the 6th Karachi International Children’s Film Festival. TRC has been helping organize this festival since its inception and the event has become an annual event on school calendars. The number of children and school staff attending the KICFF continues to grow each year and this year a record-breaking 8000 school children and teachers attended the festival.

TRC’s ECE team was invited to attend the CACHE (Council for Awards in Care, Health and Education, UK) Conference in Dubai. CACHE is endorsing TRC’s Early Childhood Education and Development Programme (English).

The first semester of the ECEDP also came to a close this quarter. Three courses were taught during this period. This is the 11th cohort of the ECE programme, and the teachers who are enrolled in the ECEDP (English) of the programme will become the first ones to receive the CACHE Certificate.

TRC also revived the ECEDP (Urdu) this year. Not only was the Urdu programme offered again after a 5 year gap, but the 17 teachers enrolled in the programme were also given scholarships that were supported by the corporate sector.

TRC continued with its workshop programme this quarter and 9 multi-school workshops and 2 talk sessions were held between October and December 2016. A school evaluation was also conducted during this time period. Throughout the quarter TRC was invited to attend various school events, seminars and conferences. TRC staff represented the organization at the AKU-EB Principals’ Conference and at the ‘The Liberal Arts Confront Globalization’ lecture. Our staff was invited to judge school competitions, concerts and debates. TRC staff also gave a presentation on the organisation at a consultative policy session on ‘Early Childhood Development in Sindh: Opportunities and Challenges’ organized by ECDN-P.

This has been a busy and promising quarter for TRC with significant progress in our outreach activities and internal organisational development.

TRC Trending…

TRC is on Facebook! This is where we share ideas, tips and news with our online teaching community. It is a space to learn new ideas, share experiences and stay informed about all the latest happenings at TRC.
(more…)

TRC Website Opinion Poll February 2017

Dear Readers,

Please check out our new Opinion Poll on whether schools should punish students, and cast your vote by the end of February 2017. As you know …

your opinion counts

Our December 2016 poll was about whether junk food should be allowed to serve in the school canteen:

Schools canteens should not serve junk food. It is ironic that schools teach junk food is bad, but continue to serve it in canteens.

• I agree. Children are usually not fully aware of how harmful junk food is. Most children do not think of health and will buy junk food from the canteen when hungry. (72%, 42 Votes)

• I disagree. Children should be allowed to eat whatever they enjoy. If the school canteen does not serve junk food, children will bring it from home. (28%, 16 Votes)

Result:
The overwhelming majority of respondents (72%) believe schools should not serve junk food as most children are not likely to think of health and will eat the junk food that is available in the canteen when hungry. A little over a quarter of the respondents (28%) believe children will eat junk regardless of whether it is served at the school canteen or not.